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Swimming Pool Capacity

Inground Pools

Pool Size Gallons
12'x24' Rect
16'x32' Rect
16'x36' Rect
18'x36' Rect
20'x40' Rect
8,640
19,200
21,600
24,300
30,000
16'x32' Oval
18'x36' Oval
20'x40' Oval
17,150
21,700
26,800
17'x33' Grecian
17'x37' Grecian
20'x36' Grecian
20'x44' Grecian
19,650
22,185
24,300
30,300
16'x30' Kidney
16'x34' Kidney
20'x38' Kidney
14,900
16,500
20,178

 

Frequently Asked Questions…

Here are some frequently asked questions that you may have
regarding your pool or pool liner from Tri-City Vinyl, Inc. We’ve got the answers!

1) How quickly can Tri-City Vinyl, Inc. manufacture a pool liner for my pool?

Tri-City Vinyl’s production time is usually one week, plus shipping time.

2) Where can I purchase a Tri-City Vinyl, Inc. pool liner from?

Any established pool company can order pool liners through Tri-City Vinyl. In Michigan, the following companies are wholesales distributors for TCV.
Quality Pool Supply – in Clio and Grand Rapids, Michigan
Cinderella, Inc. – in Grand Rapids and Saginaw, Michigan
Simco – in Benton Harbor, Michigan

3) How often does Tri-City Vinyl change pool liner designs?

Tri-City Vinyl introduces new pool liner designs every year; many of the popular designs continue to be manufactured, with additional unique and fresh designs being produced on a yearly basis.

4) What pool shapes can Tri-City Vinyl’s pool liners accommodate?

Whatever shape your pool is, TCV can produce a pool liner to fit it!

5) What kind of a warranty does Tri-City Vinyl provide to end users?

TCV offers a 15-year prorated warranty. Contact Tri-City Vinyl
at (800) 334-9949 for additional warranty information.

6) What other products does Tri-City Vinyl manufacture?

Tri-City Vinyl also manufactures pond liners in black (20 mil) and blue (30 mil).

7) I have an algae problem in my pool. What do I do to resolve it?

You may have a low sanitizer level in your pool. You need to “shock” the water by brushing the pool walls and running the pool filter for a 24-hour period of time in order to increase the distribution of the sanitizer. Lastly, add an algaecide to the pool water to kill any existing algae and future algae development.

8) My pool water is discolored? What is the cause of this?

If your pool water is green or blue-green in color, you may have high levels of pH. If the pool water is brown to red in color, you may have an overall water imbalance.

For green or blue-green water: Test the pH level of the pool water and make the appropriate adjustments.

For brown to red water: Test the pH, calcium hardness, and total alkalinity levels, and if necessary, drain all or part of the pool water and refill with fresh water.

9) The water in my pool is cloudy. Why?

There are numerous reasons your pool water may be cloudy: High pH levels; high total alkalinity levels; high calcium hardness levels; high TDS levels; low sanitizer levels; algae growth; pets going into the pool; or high swimmer load.

You should test all your chemical levels and make the appropriate adjustments.

10) There is some corrosion in my pool water. What is the cause of this?

Your pool water may have low pH levels or low total alkalinity levels. Test both the pH levels and total alkalinity levels, and then make the appropriate adjustments. You should also contact a professional service technician or local pool supply store for additional information.

11) There seems to be pH resistance in my pool water. What can I do to resolve this?

Your total alkalinity levels are high, so perform a total alkalinity levels test and make the appropriate adjustments.

12) My pool water is experiencing poor sanitizer efficiency. What should I do?

More than likely your pool water has high pH levels and total alkalinity levels.
Test the pH levels and total alkalinity levels, and then make the appropriate adjustments.

13) There are scales forming on my pool liner, how can I get rid of them?

Scales may be caused by the following: High pH levels; high total alkalinity levels; high calcium hardness levels; or high TDS levels.

You need to test the pH and total alkalinity levels and make the appropriate adjustments. If necessary, you should contact a pool professional and have them drain the pool, then scrub down the walls and refill the pool with fresh water.

14) I have noticed that when we go swimming, our skin and eyes get irritated. What is the cause of this?

You may have low or high pH levels; low or high total alkalinity levels; or low sanitizer levels. Test both the pH and total alkalinity levels, making the appropriate adjustments. Plus, test the sanitizer levels and if necessary, shock the pool water.

15) There are numerous stains on my pool liner. How can I resolve this?

You may have low pH or total alkalinity levels or high TDS levels. Test the pH and total alkalinity levels, making the appropriate adjustments. Then if necessary, contact a pool professional and have them drain the pool, scrub down the walls, and refill the pool with fresh water. You may also want to contact a professional service technician or a pool retailer for additional information.

16) Why is it so important to maintain the pH levels in my pool water?

The pH level provides you with a reading of how acidic or basic your pool water is. Monitoring the pH levels of your pool water will help you to determine possible problems that may occur with high pH readings and low pH readings.

The ideal pH range for pool water is between 7.4-7.6. Any reading below 7.4 means your water is acidic.

To correct this problem, you should add soda ash or sodium bicarbonate, two substances found at your local pool supply store.

If the pH level is above 7.6, it means the water is basic or alkaline. You will need to add some liquid Muriatic acid to the pool water, which can be purchased at a local pool supply store.

Always remember: Before adding any chemicals to your pool water in order to adjust your pH levels, you must first consider the total alkalinity levels.

Common problems with pH levels:

High pH levels Low pH levels

Scales pool surfaces and equipment Corrodes surfaces and equipment
Contributes to cloudy water Wrinkles and fades vinyl liner
Drops efficiency of chlorine Increases chlorine consumption
Irritates swimmers’ skin/eyes Irritates swimmers’ skin/eyes

17) What is the total alkalinity level and how does it affect my pool?

Total alkalinity is a measure of the pool water’s ability to neutralize acid (water’s buffering capacity) and keep your pH level within the proper range.

Remember: Total alkalinity affects your pool’s pH levels and so you must be tested before you perform any pH testing and adjustments.

You want the total alkalinity levels for your pool to range from 80-140 ppm.

Common problems with total alkalinity levels:

High total alkalinity levels

Low total alkalinity levels

Poor sanitizer efficiency
Skin and eye irritation
Scale formation
Hard to change pH
Cloudy water

Stained, etched or dissolved plaster
Skin and eye irritation
Rapid changes in pH or “pH bounce”
Corroded metals/equipment


18) What is water hardness (calcium hardness) and how does it affect my pool?

Water hardness is the concentration of calcium and magnesium in your pool water.

Depending on your water source, the hardness in your water varies. For instance, well water has a higher mineral content and therefore is “harder” versus fresh water that has gone through a treatment plant.

Regardless, you do want your pool water to have some level of hardness. Too soft of water will slowly dissolve the plaster and any metal in your pool, while too much water hardness will cause scale formation on the walls and the pool water will look cloudy.

19) What are “total dissolved solids” (TDS) and how do they affect my pool?

TDS includes everything dissolved in your pool water --- from metals to chlorine---to sulfates, alkalinity, and salts.

You want your TDS range to be between 1,000-2,000 ppm.

If your pool experiences a TDS problem, the pool water may taste salty or it may have a slight tint to it (but no clouding) or see algae growth and get false test readings.

If you are worried that your pool has a TDS problem, contact a professional service technician for assistance or take a water sample to your pool supply store’s water lab for more tests.

20) What are the acceptable ranges for the different chemicals that go into
a pool’s water?

Chlorine 1.0-3.0 ppm

Bromine 2.0-4.0 ppm

pH 7.4-7.6

Total Alkalinity 80-140 ppm

Calcium Hardness 200-400 ppm

TDS 1,000-2,000 ppm

 

Tri City -Vinyl is proud to sell our liners throughout the U.S through a network of
high-quality pool liner dealers. Call or e-mail us to locate a dealer near you!
Call (800) 334-9949